Strict Standards: Only variables should be assigned by reference in /home3/jimmcd/public_html/plugins/content/hmtube/hmtube.php on line 25

A Place Where There's No More Pain

Life of Agony

A Place Where There’s No More Pain

Napalm Records

Release Date: April 28, 2017

www.NapalmRecords.com

For the unfamiliar, Life of Agony is one of NYC’s premiere bands. Maybe their record sales don’t reflect that, but I dare you (the triple dog kind) to find any musician in heavy music that wouldn’t acknowledge their importance and their brilliance. Although the bulk of their work came in the nineties, the band has been on again/off again throughout the new millennium and their latest meet-up has given us A Place Where There’s No More Pain, the loooong-awaited follow up to Broken Valley.

“Meet My Maker” kicks of the album in classic LOA style. That NYC city bounce that Joey Z. is so good at (invented even?), immediately rises to the forefront as Caputo’s voice slithers around it. The same rings true for the title track as the band gets a little heavier. The rhythm section pushes the song along as Caputo’s voice soars over the top of it all before the hardcore leaning bridge leads you to the explosive chorus that you are salivating for! The title track, in my opinion, is the “Weeds”/ “How It Would Be”/”River Runs Red”/ “Love to Let You Down” of the album. It’s that standout track that you will ALWAYS come back to.  

The driving “Bag of Bones” is another highlight here, offering a bit more of a straight up Rock bent and some of Caputo’s best vocal work to date. It’s a bit bluesy and very, very emotional. “Song For the Abused” is another standout track. I wouldn’t say it’s one of my favorite tracks, but it manages to set itself apart with some more commercial sounding guitar work and some layered vocals that give it a slightly different feel from the rest of the album. The near-ambient “Little Spots of You” takes the album out on an odd note, featuring piano and Caputo’s canned sounding, almost spoken word vocals. It’s very similar to some of Caputo’s solo work and, while I don’t dislike it, it feels very out of place here.

I must admit that this one took a minute to grow on me. Truth is, I had gotten used to the rockier sound of Broken Valley over the years. A Place Where There’s No More Pain is sort of a mix of Broken Valley and Ugly and the more I listen the more enjoyable it gets.  As with any LOA album, this just isn’t the kind of music that you can relegate to the background. It commands your attention and Mina Caputo’s emotional and honest lyrics need some time to sink in.

Reviewed by mark1340

 #LifeOfAgony #mark1340 #NapalmRecords 

Add comment


Security code
Refresh


This site designed and maintained by Burning Point Media.

Copyright © 2015. All Rights Reserved.